Are we sitting ducks for COVID?

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It is widely believed by epidemiologists that the COVID-19 virus will be around for a very long time.

Presently, we are witnessing an alarming escalation of cases in our country which comes as no surprise to us.

For decades, there has been speculation about T&T’S unpreparedness to deal with such a health hazard of immense proportion.

Sad to say that today we are the consumers of sour grapes due to the failure and innate inability of the state to take strong affirmative action to mitigate the spread of the deadly virus.

A humongous part of our problem lies in our unprotected porous borders that permit easy entry of illegal immigrants. From the borders, they proceed to remote areas of our country.

To this day, no concerted attempt has been made to deter them from entering. How long will this be allowed to continue? Trinbagonians are by cultural nature a happy, easy going people with a passion for festivities.

Unfortunately, the much discussed April fiasco in our sister isle has taken us many steps towards the fatal virus.

And this is nothing from the truth as presented on the graphs of epidemiologists.

Noticeably, the rising cases in Tobago also attest to the fact that a serious blunder of encouragement for Trinidadians to vacation there, had been served by our Prime Minister who also contracted the disease.

Nevertheless, we must also agree that many of our citizens must also be blamed for the spread of the disease by their blatant refusal to comply with the stipulated protocols.

For how long can our businesses remain closed? Thousands of our citizens are fast becoming members of the penniless posse. They need to be expeditiously employed to provide for their families.

I would like to know when does government expect to achieve full herd immunity when the acquisition and roll out of the vaccine is so slow? This isn’t a good signal and spells hell for our citizens.

Approximately 250 persons have died in the month of May.

Some patients have to wait three to four days under tents before they can be sent to other venues.

There are only 24 ventilators for the whole country.

Approximately 700 COVID patients are in home quarantine thereby infecting members of their families.

Why must this be for a country that is rich in oil and gas and rated with distinction on the Caribbean economic index.? Apparently, the citizens of our country have been unconsciously and helplessly led to Mr COVID’s slaughter house.

How scary is that? Given the fact that it is now the norm to have about five to six hundred cases per day, we can analyse that by the end of the month there’ll be approximately 15,000 – 18,000 infected persons.

If we fail to achieve herd immunity, the number of infected persons may well surpass a quarter of a million and the number of deaths may very likely to be 5,000 – 6,000.

We must continue praying and hoping for the protection all citizens.

At the same time our government must undertake its role most seriously.

LYNDSEY RAMPERSAD