Appeal for new breed of leaders

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Since 1962 our politics, development, productivity, management and leadership seemed not to have moved in keeping with the imperatives of changing times.

I say this openly because of the discomfort I now experience as a result of what passes for politics in the nation, and management and productivity in the public service.

This development may be the result of the types of people who seek office or the difficulty of managing worker perception in the public service.

My fear, however, is that our political parties may have developed visions limited to capturing power rather than have been motivated to embrace missions concerned with how we as a people can address scientifically the challenges of an unfolding civilisation.

More specifically, I am inclined to believe that our political parties may not carefully have been reflecting on the need, process, and consequences of succession as they relate to political ideology in a changing world.

Rather than meeting the approval of the influential in the party, potential candidates should be screened over time within their track record as a person and member of the party. The sudden emergence of “just comes” may not necessarily be a good idea.

Yes! People can present themselves with a flawless track record and impeccable academic qualifications. But what do such presentations tell us about their true personality, inner thoughts, and long-term goals.

Another concern is whether we, without exposing them to the demanding dynamics of real politics, should put heavy responsibilities in the hands of political OJTs – responsibilities which demand the impossible and the wisdom of Solomon.

Politics is not a game of Monopoly. It demands incredible integrity and commitment, as well as a passionate desire to serve at great sacrifice with empathy, humility, compassion, and emotional intelligence.

Also, candidates must be able to understand how the lack of oversight can frustrate policy objectives and effective administration. Examples include the long outstanding salary arrears owed recurrently to public service personnel and our ill maintained public buildings and river courses.

Covid19 to my mind should have been clear in its message that we cannot continue with our business as usual attitude. The world has been changing and will be more demanding in the post-covid19 period.

My point is that we must take more seriously the selection of candidates and senators who may eventually represent their constituencies and run ministries. People may not agree with me but we cannot continue to manage our country as we did in 1962.

If you don’t agree with me just review some of the laws on our law books, the core practices of our public service, and the tendencies of our politicians. Running a country is serious business. We are no longer in a pre-1956 context.

RAYMOND S HACKETT
Curepe