Judging those in charge of the Judges
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Editorial

Judging those in charge of the Judges

Judging those in charge of the Judges

Our Judiciary is facing an upheaval of titanic proportions. The Chief Justice no longer has the confidence of the majority of the legal fraternity. And in addition to that, the Judicial Legal and Services Commission is facing allegations in the court that it is operating illegally.

The Chief Justice matter has received more of the headlines of late. The fiasco involving the appointment of Marcia Ayers-Caesar and her subsequent resignation has gravely impacted the reputation of the Chief Justice. And the fact that attorneys no longer have confidence in him is a serious matter, since he is the individual overseeing our Judicial System. A lack of confidence in him translates into a lack of confidence in the Judicial System itself.

The matters involving the JLSC are also creeping into the spotlight. Recently, the JLSC faced a matter in court, and conceded, that it has in fact been operating illegally, since it is comprised of four members, instead of the constitutionally required five. And its membership is facing another challenge in the court: another filing points out that two retired judges are sitting on the JLSC. The constitution makes provision for only one such member. The JLSC is supposed to select and appoint judges for the country’s courts, yet it seems it can’t even ensure its own members are accurate according to the law.

Some say the challenges to both the JLSC and the Chief Justice are vindictive, targeted at the CJ in particular, as he is the head of the JLSC. For those who care for technicalities though, it is fully justifiable. The strength of any legal system lies in its integrity. Citizens are encouraged to trust the judgements passed down by a select few. How can we do that, if the elite overseeing the entire system, are not adhering to the law themselves? Their roles are ones that must be beyond reproach. Their integrity must be able to stand up to even the toughest scrutiny. Right now, that simply isn’t the case.

Web Master

June 7th, 2017

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